Worm Poops

Vermicompost

Our worms turn food waste into valuable worm castings, a fantastic soil amendment.

What is vermicompost

Vermicomposting is a method of composting that utilizes worms to break down organic matter and produce nutrient-rich castings (worm poops). Worm castings are a valuable soil amendment that can improve the structure, fertility, and water-holding capacity of soil. They are rich in nutrients and beneficial microbes, which can help plants grow healthier and more resistant to pests and diseases.

Why making your own worm castings is better

Besides the obvious cost benefits, the castings we make are of far higher quality. The castings you can buy are likely fed inorganic food, and they may go heavy on things like cardboard that lack nutrients. We also particularly like the worm castings we make because of the beneficial microbes they harbour. When you buy worm castings from the store they are devoid of life because they must be packaged and sold according to certain regulations. This time spent sitting in warehouses kills all the soil life present in the castings.

How to make castings

The process of vermicomposting involves setting up a worm bin and providing the worms with a balanced diet of organic matter such as fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds, and paper products. The worms consume the organic matter and produce nutrient-rich castings, also known as vermicompost.

Vermicompost is an excellent soil amendment that can improve the structure, fertility, and water-holding capacity of soil. It is rich in nutrients and beneficial microbes, which can help plants grow healthier and more resistant to pests and diseases.

View More Projects

Check out some other stuff we’ve been working on.

    Hugelkultur is essentially a large amount of logs, branches and other woody debris covered in compost, soil. The wood inside acts like a sponge, holding a tremendous amount of water and also providing copious food for fungi.

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    Keeping a large amount of biomass (straw, grass, wood chips, etc) on top of the soil retains moisture, suppresses weeds and slowly breaks down building soil with lots of organic material. We also grow edible mushrooms in the mulch of all our garden beds.

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